Growing up Irish in early twentieth century New Zealand – public lecture

Anna Davin posterThe Irish Centre for Histories of Labour & Class (based at NUI Galway) and the NUI Galway School of Humanities Civic Engagement committee are organising a public lecture next week by Dr Anna Davin on ‘Growing up Irish in early twentieth century New Zealand’. The event takes place at 20.30 on Wednesday, 30 April 2014, in the Town Hall Theatre (studio), Galway. Entry is €3 (€2 concession), and all are welcome. Advance booking at the Town Hall is advisable (091 569777). A poster for the event is available above, and further details on the talk follow below. We look forward to seeing you there!
Dr Davin, a pioneering feminist historian of the 1970s, a founder of the History Workshop movement in Oxford, and author of the influential Growing up poor: home, school and street in London, 1870-1914, has recently been researching her own family background in Co. Galway and New Zealand. Her antecedents include Ellen Silke of Ballindooley, who left Ireland in 1866 and two years later got married in New Zealand to John Crowe of Corrandulla. Another ancestor was Patrick Davin of Tonegurrane, Corrandulla. In this lecture Dr Davin will discuss the fortunes of these people and their families.

There’s something about St Patrick

DÓC001-TVHere, in case you missed it, is our very own Professor Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, discussing Patrick, Palladius, and the origins of Irish Christianity with Neil Delamere. The interview is part of a documentary called There’s something about Patrick, first broadcast on RTÉ 1 television on 17 March. You can catch the whole programme on the RTÉ Player, or have a listen to Delamere chat about the documentary with John Murray on RTÉ Radio 1.

The legacy of the Irish Parliamentary Party in Free State politics- This Week’s Seminar

Stamp_irl_1922_2N6seThis week (2 April) we are delighted to have a paper from one of our own postgraduate community: Martin O’Donoghue. His paper will examine ‘The legacy of the Irish Parliamentary Party in Free State politics, 1922-26′. This seminar will be our last of the semester (how time flies!). We look forward to seeing you there.

Speaker: Martin O’Donoghue (NUI Galway)
Title: ’The legacy of the Irish Parliamentary Party in Free State Politics, 1922-26’
Time & Date: 16.00, 2 April 2014
Venue: Room G010, Humanities and Social Sciences Research Building, NUI Galway

All are welcome!

[Image: 1922 2/6 value King George V stamp overprinted Saorstát Éireann 1922 for use in the newly independent Irish Free State; source: Wikimedia Commons.]

The Iroquois who converted a Jesuit- Next week’s seminar

Greer PosterNext week (26 March) we are delighted to welcome Professor Allen Greer, Canada Research Chair in Colonial North America at McGill University in Canada, to the weekly history seminar here at NUI Galway. Professor Greer’s research interests centre on the history of early Canada in the context of colonial North America and the Early Modern Atlantic World.  He is the author of multiple books and articles, a number of which have won national and international awards.  Among these publications are La Nouvelle-France et le Monde (2009), The People of New France (1997), The Patriots and the People (1993) and Peasant, Lord and Merchant (1985).  An expert in Jesuit mission history and cultural relations, he is also the editor of The Jesuit Relations: Natives and Missionaries in Seventeenth-Century North America (2000), and the author of Mohawk Saint: Catherine Tekakwitha and the Jesuits (2005).

His talk next week will be on ‘Kateri Tekakwitha (1656-80): the Iroquois who converted a Jesuit’. We look forward to seeing you there.

Speaker: Professor Allen Greer (McGill University)
Title: ’Kateri Tekakwitha (1656-80): the Iroquois who converted a Jesuit’
Time & Date: 16.00, 26 March 2014
Venue: Room G010, Humanities and Social Sciences Research Building, NUI Galway

All are welcome!

Enlightenment Craving For Information- This Week’s Seminar

776px-Oer-Weimarer_MusenhofThis week (19 March) we are delighted to have a paper from one of the newest additions to the history community here at NUI Galway: Ida Pugliese, a Marie Curie Fellow and graduate of the universities of Milan, Strathclyde, and the European University Institute, Florence. Her talk will be on ‘Enlightenment craving for information: the use of questionnaires for information exchange during the 18th century’. We look forward to seeing you there.

Speaker: Dr Ida Pugliese (NUI Galway)
Title: ‘Enlightenment craving for information: the use of questionnaires for information exchange during the 18th century’
Time & Date: 16.00, 19 March 2014
Venue: Room G010, Humanities and Social Sciences Research Building, NUI Galway

All are welcome!

[Image: Anicet-Charles-Gabriel Lemonnier, 'Lecture de la tragédie de l'orphelin de la Chine de Voltaire dans le salon de madame Geoffrin', source: Wikimedia Commons.]

The Siege of Dublin, 1534 – This Week’s Seminar

p27_CHAPTER 4-520x324This week (12 March) we are delighted to have our own Head of School, Steven Ellis, deliver a paper to our seminar on ‘The Siege of Dublin, 1534′. We will look forward to seeing you all there.

Speaker: Professor Steven Ellis (NUI Galway)
Title: ‘The siege of Dublin, 1534′
Time & Date: 16.00, 12 March 2014
Venue: Room G010, Humanities and Social Sciences Research Building, NUI Galway

All are welcome!

[Image: Sixteenth-century woodcut of Silken Thomas's (Thomas FitzGerald, 10th Earl of Kildare) attack on Dublin Castle, Wikimedia Commons.]

The Singing Flame Rekindled – Public Lecture, 10 Mar 2014

ReganPosterThe NUI Galway-based Irish Centre for Histories of Labour & Class is organising a public lecture next week by John M. Regan (University of Dundee) on ‘The Singing Flame rekindled: the destruction of the Public Records Office, 30 June 1922′. The event takes place at 20.00 on Monday, 10 March 2014, in the Town Hall Theatre, Galway. Entry is €3 (€2 concession), and all are welcome. Poster available above, and further details below. We look forward to seeing you there!

‘The Singing Flame Rekindled: The Destruction of the Public Records Office 30 June 1922′
In the opening engagement of the Irish civil war on the 30th June 1922, the irreplaceable archive held in the Public Records Office inside Dublin’s Four Courts was destroyed by fire and explosion. 

Immediately the opposing Free State forces and anti-treaty IRA blamed each other for the Public Records Office’s destruction. In recent years some leading historians have claimed that the anti-treaty IRA deliberately destroyed the archive as act of vandalism before surrendering to the Free State Army. The evidence for this interpretation, as Dr John M. Regan explains in his lecture, is far from conclusive.

Regan revisits an iconic event of modern Irish history to open a discussion about the different ways history is written. Interpretations of the destruction of the Public Records Office, Regan argues, demonstrate how some historians reinterpreted the past in response to the recent ‘Troubles’ in Northern Ireland.

The reinterpretation Regan describes rewrites the past not as it happened, or the way we were taught it happened, but instead recasts history in a more desirable form better suited to our needs in the present. This approach to the past has sometimes been inaccurately called ‘Revisionist History’, but like other professional historians Regan’s call the approached ‘Invented History’, where its aim is to amend, redefine, and ‘improve’ the publics’ memory. Invented history, Regan says, has been a preoccupation of some Irish historians over recent decades, but he questions whether or not society is best served by it.

Dr John M. Regan is lecturer in Irish, British, and Public History at the University of Dundee, Scotland. His latest book Myth and the Irish State was published by Irish Academic Press in December 2013.

Vótaí do Mhná – Votes for Women

Votaí do Mhná poster 3A new documentary, Vótaí do Mhná – Votes for Women, directed by Keith O’Grady, will be broadcast on TG4 this week and should be of interest to our readers. It includes contributions from two members of the History community here at NUI Galway – Micheline Sheehy Skeffington and Mary Clancy. Cast your eye on TG4 on 5 March at 21.30, and again on 8 March at 20.50, or set your VCR/DVD-R/Sky Box/UPC thingy (other devices are available) to make sure you don’t miss it. The description below should give you a good sense of what the programme is all about. Happy viewing!

Vótaí do Mhná – Votes for Women

How Irishwomen obtained the vote is a story of organisation and bravery in the face of ignorance, indifference and hostility. In this decade of political anniversaries in Ireland it provides a very different understanding of Home Rule, World War I and the Irish revolutionary period. Every mainstream political party in Ireland and Britain opposed votes for women in the lead up to WWI – women were barred from voting in Westminster, and were also going to be barred in any Dublin, or Belfast based parliament. It was left to women such as Hanna Sheehy Skeffington, Louie Bennett, and Constance Markievicz, with the assistance of a minority radical socialist and republican men, to actively work to secure the vote that was finally achieved for women over 30 in 1918, in a much changed country following the upheaval of WWI and the 1916 Rising.

Vótaí do Mhná – Votes for Women features contributions from NUIG’s Micheline Sheehy Skeffington, the grand-daughter of Hanna and Frank Sheehy Skeffington, and Mary Clancy, lecturer in Women’s Studies, and joint editor of Saothar: Journal of the Irish Labour History Society.

Vótaí do Mhná – Votes for Women was produced by Dearcán Media with support from the Irish Language Broadcast Fund.

 

Cantreds and kingdoms in Connacht in pre- and post-Norman times – This week’s seminar

773px-Co._Sligo,_Ballymote_Castle_2,_1792This week (5 March) we welcome another visiting speaker to our weekly seminar series: Paul McCotter of University College Cork. His topic will be: ‘Cantreds and kingdoms in Connacht in pre- and post-Norman times’. We hope to see you there!

 

Speaker: Dr Paul McCotter (UCC)
Title: ‘Cantreds and kingdoms in Connacht in pre- and post-Norman times’
Time & Date: 16.00, 5 March 2014
Venue: Room G010, Humanities and Social Sciences Research Building, NUI Galway

All are welcome!

[Image: Ballymote Castle, Co. Sligo – sketched in the 1790s.]

‘Bearing all kinds of witness to war’ – This week’s seminar

800px-The_Burning_of_Cork_(9713428703)This week (26 February) we are delighted to welcome Anne Dolan from Trinity College Dublin to our seminar. Her subject is ‘”Bearing all kinds of witness to war”: violence in revolutionary Ireland, 1919-21′. We will look forward to seeing you all there.

Speaker: Dr Anne Dolan (TCD)
Title: ‘”Bearing all kinds of witness to war”: violence in revolutionary Ireland, 1919-21′
Time & Date: 16.00, 26 February 2014
Venue: Room G010, Humanities and Social Sciences Research Building, NUI Galway

All are welcome!

[Image: the burning of Cork, December 1920, taken by W. D. Hogan. Source:the National Library of Ireland on Flickr Commons.]

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